Homemade Truffle Gnocchi

Homemade Truffle Gnocchi

Let’s be honest, who wouldn’t love this dish? My truffle gnocchi are fluffy, creamy, and decadent, a comfort dish for sure. In Italian, gnocchi means “little pillows” and that’s exactly how gnocchi should be. This dish is indulgent and makes the perfect date night or dinner party dish, just turn on the Sinatra and enjoy making these beautiful little gnocchi.

You’ll need two things that not everyone may have. One is a food mill or potato ricer. This is how you get the potato so light and fluffy. They’re pretty cheap on Amazon. You’ll also need a gnocchi board to create the little ridges in them. They are also pretty cheap to buy but if you want to do without, you could roll them on a fork easily!



Homemade Truffle Gnocchi

Serves 2, with some leftovers.

For the gnocchi:
-1 lb. of yukon gold potatoes (about 2-3 large ones)
-1 cup of 00 flour
-1 large egg, whisked
-1/2 tsp salt
-freshly grated nutmeg

For the truffle bechamel:
-3 cups of whole milk
-3 tbsp. good white truffle oil
-1 tbsp. butter
-1/4 cup of AP flour
-salt
-pepper
-freshly grated nutmeg
-1 cup of grated parmigiano for the sauce
-1 cup of grated parmigiano for topping





To make your gnocchi, boil the potatoes unpeeled in a pot of water until tender, about 30 minutes. Remove them and set aside in a bowl. Once they’ve cooled just enough to touch, remove the skin with your hands. Place the warm potatoes through a food mill or potato ricer (this is what makes good gnocchi so light and pillowy). Place your fluffy riced potatoes on a large work area or cutting board.

Sprinkle the flour, nutmeg, and salt around the potatoes. Create a well in the center or the potatoes, and place your whisked egg in there. Use your hands and slowly pull the potatoe and flour into the egg, mixing lightly to combine. Add a bit of flour to your surface and knead the dough for just a few minutes until it comes together, but it should be pretty shaggy and moist feeling still in contrast to a traditional pasta dough. Cover your dough with a clean kitchen towel to keep the moisture.

Cut a golf ball size chunk off your dough and use your hands to roll it out into a log about 3/4 inch in diameter. Cut the gnocchi in 3/4-1 inch sections depending on how big you like your gnocchi. And remember, it doesn’t have to be perfect! That’s the beauty of Italian cooking. Use your thumb to roll the dough on a floured gnocchi board, creating little ridges in the dough that will hold onto that sauce. When you roll it over, it should create a little hollow tunnel underneath the gnocchi, which will also help with the lightness of it and catching that sauce. (Look at the photos below for help if you need it.)

shape of homemade gnocchi



For the sauce, in a small saucepan over medium/low heat, heat your milk gently stirring occasionally. Add some freshly grated nutmeg. In a saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the truffle oil and flour, stirring to create your roux for about 4-5 minutes as it becomes slightly golden. Add in the warm milk and whisk constantly as it will thicken and become a rich, beautiful sauce. Add in 1 cup of your cheese and stir. Lower the heat to just keep it warm.

Cook your gnocchi in boiling salted water. When they begin to float, give them another minute to cook and then remove them from the water and add to your sauce.

Plate your gnocchi in your dish of choice. Mine weren’t oven safe, so I topped with truffle oil, more parmigiano cheese, and torched the top to melt the cheese using a creme brulee torch. You could also do the same and pop it in a 400 degree oven for a few minutes.

Buon appetito!



Truffle Gnocchi

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